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Stem cell treatment makes wonders for wounded joints

Stem cell treatment makes wonders for wounded joints

It sounds almost too good to be true! But, in fact, if you get diagnosed with your wounded joints, treatment with stem cells, immune cells, growth factors and fibrin (iPRF) from your own blood can delay the development of severe osteoarthritis. But what is actually happening and why do not traditional treatments like cortisone spray work the same way?

Osteoarthritis may end with surgery. On your way there may have been pain relief medications, gone to physical therapy, suffered pain relief through acupuncture and maybe even have to go down a few kilos of weight. Failure to treat any kind of treatment can cause serious health consequences.

 

Cortisone syringes have been very common to use in the treatment of joint pain. It gives a transient relief and works anti-inflammatory. But what we now know is that repeated injections can make the condition worse because cortisone can break down the already damaged cartilage even more. If you have had time for surgery but have recently been on cortisone, you may risk postponing your surgery for several months until the cortisone is out of the body.

 

Injections with hyaluronic acid have also been used. It lubricates joints and relieves the pain, but it has no regenerative effect on the already damaged tissue such as plasma / serum from your own blood.

iPRF also works anti-inflammatory and pain relief. However, because injected into the joints is only plasma / serum from your own blood, it stimulates cells to repair broken tissues and make new tissues. The iPRF is broken down by the body, but before it’s gone, it has given away the essential stem cells and growth factors. The protein fibrin prolongs the effect on the treatment.

In this way, the tissue is built up instead of breaking down further, which can lead to better joint function with less pain. But remember – neither the effect of this treatment lasts forever. The treatment must be maintained in consultation with the doctor.

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